review
By Juan Barquin | December 8, 2022

The film presents itself as empathetic towards its protagonist but has little interest in navigating the murky terrain of what it means to exist as a fat, queer person in a world that loathes you.

review
By Shonni Enelow | December 2, 2022

This is a psychological ghost story, to be sure, with classic elements of that genre; where Hogg departs from its typical analogies, however, is in her location of the mystery not in the unconscious of one person but in a relationship with an other.

feature
By Daniel Witkin | December 1, 2022
Screen Play

The soccer highlight video has proliferated. Whether 90 seconds or 10-plus minutes, these little portraits of players are essential for fans who try to keep up with the game in all its inexhaustible intricacies . . . They also have an aesthetic of their own, with their own characteristic music, montage, and mise-en-scène.

interview
By Chris Shields | December 1, 2022

2nd Chance presents another story from the annals of capitalist pathology, but this time, what we see is almost too wild to be true. Entrepreneur and inventor Richard Davis has had the distinction of shooting himself more than 100 times.

review
By Matthew Eng | November 22, 2022

It retains the impassioned clarity of her style while enlisting its primary subject as its co-author. Nan Goldin provides illuminating, clarifying, and always candid commentary on the many chapters of her life in one-on-one interviews with Poitras, conducted on weekends during COVID.

review
By Justin Stewart | November 22, 2022

Here, cannibalism rather than vampirism is the favored protean allegory for outcast rootlessness, codependency, hormonal youthful yearning, and antsy wanderlust. Mostly it is about not belonging, with cannibalism stepping in for commoner differences.

review
By Gavin Smith | November 18, 2022

The busyness and expansiveness and deft choreography of White Noise do not quite camouflage its superficial engagement with played-out themes (consumerism, better living through chemistry, coming to terms with mortality) located in family life and couples, Baumbach’s perennial territory.

review
By Chris Wisniewski | November 18, 2022

Throughout the film, Ellis will justify his decision to join the military in terms of the meaning it will confer on his life, a meaning that is otherwise absent, it seems, because he lacks ties to bind him to anything outside of himself.

review
By Keith Uhlich | November 16, 2022

Is the jackass dreaming of the electric sheep, or is it dreaming of him? Perhaps the unfathomability of the images, and our respective, deeply personal reactions to them, are all there is.

review
By Michael Koresky | November 16, 2022

Though this is perhaps the ultimate Spielberg film, it does not move or feel like one. He is going for something else: a thoughtfully unshowy aesthetic that heightens one’s awareness of being a viewer. Watching, we’re rarely thinking about what the camera is doing, but rather what it is showing and why.

feature
By Z. W. Lewis | November 14, 2022
At the Museum

Tsuchimoto made more than a dozen more films about Minamata, which reflects a level of personal dedication unrivaled by most other documentarians. He also made films about student revolts, the plight of the average fisherman, Siberia, and Afghanistan.

review
By Esther Rosenfield | November 10, 2022

A Couple could be uncharitably described as repetitive; Sophia returns again and again to the ways her husband wounded and slighted her, and even at a mere hour of runtime the film can feel as though it is retreading old ground. But the film is slipperier than these repetitions initially make it seem.

review
By Edo Choi | November 2, 2022

This is a delicately painful and painfully honest film, a portrait of innocence shading into experience set among the shadows of an American past that could scarcely feel more present.

feature

We’re All Going to the World’s Fair, The Funhouse, Ginger Snaps, Frenzy, Maniac, Baby Blood, Possum

review
By Juan Barquin | October 28, 2022

A believable erotic tension builds in both silence and conversation. The film evinces a fascination with how people watch and learn from each other, its protagonists trying on different styles of performance.