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By Chris Shields | June 25, 2022
At the Museum

An appreciation of George A. Romero's beloved, decades-spanning horror epic, in conjunction with the screening series Films of the Dead: Romero & Co., which plays June 25–July 30, 2022 at MoMI, and the Museum's exhibition Living with The Walking Dead.
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interview
By Caitlin Quinlan | June 27, 2022

All of my films really reside in this guilt that I feel of having, for a time, integrated this French injunction of separating myself from working class neighborhoods . . . I return to these neighborhoods in order to make visible the people I have been made to believe were not worthy of being represented in film.

review
By Dan Schindel | June 24, 2022

Flux Gourmet favors a maximalist brand of satire, inflating mundane peccadilloes into epic proportions.

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Elden Ring is not just a single-player game but a sandbox, a hobby, a lifestyle. It sold 12 million copies in a single month. It is, bar-none, the event game of the year.

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By Juan Barquin | June 8, 2022
Festival Dispatch

Death and distance play a key role in many films nominated for the Queer Palm this year at Cannes, and many of them forgo a meaningful exploration of their characters’ desires.

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This was the first year that the film curators of MoMI visited the Cannes Film Festival together. Eric Hynes and Edo Choi compare notes on the scene, the culture of the festival, the slate, and what it might mean for MoMI.

review
By Michael Koresky | June 3, 2022

Even after his string of fictionalized autobiographical films, Davies featured surrogates whose experiences allow him to come to terms (philosophical, aesthetic, moral, sexual, always personal) with a world that has too often betrayed, disappointed, and made shame out of beauty.

review
By Eileen G'Sell | June 3, 2022

Tonally uneven and a bit didactic in its dialogue, Crimes is nevertheless a film that both takes itself as a serious piece of art and lampoons the appetite for novel spectacle that subsumes so much of contemporary visual culture.

review
By Kambole Campbell | June 2, 2022

Vividly imagining a new future for the African diaspora, Neptune Frost is a sprawling Afro-centric science fiction that at once uplifts the oppressed and dresses down neocolonialism and binary thinking.

interview
By Dan Schindel | May 29, 2022

I have never had a shot in my digital movies which has gone on for more than seven or eight minutes at the most. It is important to use the medium and not let the medium use you.

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By A.G. Sims | May 27, 2022
Screen Play

One unifying concept ties it all together, Faraut believes, and that is the idea of time and the ability of a good director and a good tennis player to sculpt within it. His ideas are deeply rooted in the theories of Serge Daney.

review
By Lawrence Garcia | May 24, 2022

Miguel Gomes is a director who tends to enfold question, answer, and, especially, non-answer, into his actual films. His latest, The Tsugua Diaries, co-directed with his partner Maureen Fazendeiro, is arguably the most systematic working-out of this tendency.

review
By Matthew Eng | May 20, 2022

So much of the screenplay is concerned with the flashy presence of big, topical themes like Trauma, Abuse, and Toxic Masculinity. Garland is intrigued by these themes as talking points, but he is incapable of incorporating them into the lived realities of his characters in ways that feel organically rooted in real-world concerns.

review
By Ryan Swen | May 16, 2022

The sense of characterization emerges equally from the supposed downtime, the moments between the conversations.

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By Forrest Cardamenis | May 13, 2022

The resplendence of the cave sequences must be seen to be believed, and their ingenuity marks Il Buco as a significant work of digital filmmaking.