review
By Jeff Reichert | June 23, 2017

We hear story after story in which subjects betray more than they would like about their class, race, personal successes, failures, and family before the patient, gentle cameras.

review
By Adam Nayman | June 23, 2017

Amirpour seems to have placed herself in a cozily indulgent trance, mesmerized by the possibilities of deluxe, corporately subsidized cult filmmaking.

review
By Michael Joshua Rowin | June 23, 2017

The Big Sick was directed by Michael Showalter, whose anarchic sensibility (as best represented in his absurdist sketch comedy troupes The State and Stella) is completely absent from the film.

review
By Nick Pinkerton | June 20, 2017

Tavernier approaches his subject not only as a film lover but also as a film director who knows his way around a set, a man with an inexhaustible appetite for dish about behind-the-scenes goings on and an insatiable curiosity for what makes movies tick.

review
By Michael Joshua Rowin | June 9, 2017

As the cinematic past increasingly recedes we will probably see a lot more films like Dawson City: Frozen Time, a documentary that attempts to reacquaint viewers with film as film at the same time as it eulogizes the former material basis of the medium.

review
By Adam Nayman | June 7, 2017

The juxtaposition of different kinds of interiority, of a living space and a headspace being simultaneously invaded, is sophisticated and clever. It is also not quite enough to offset the accumulation of cliches that Shults uses to shape his story, which is little more than pretense for shows of stylistic force.

symposium
By Jeff Reichert | May 30, 2017

The Trump Executive Order on Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements forgoes the essential human perspective, as seen in the Chantal Akerman film From the Other Side, set between Agua Prieta, Mexico and Douglas, Arizona.

symposium
By Emma Piper-Burket | May 30, 2017

The Executive Order on Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States reveals the ease with which the current administration targets the most vulnerable and misunderstood among us, the subject of the great Iranian documentary The House Is Black.

symposium
By Greg Cwik | May 30, 2017

The current President, and former self-professed law-and-order candidate, seems to take his cues from the New York seventies vigilantism of Death Wish, as evidenced by his Executive Order on a Task Force on Crime Reduction and Public Safety.

review
By Daniel Witkin | May 26, 2017

While the New York–set Hermia and Helena carries on the alternately fastidious and freewheeling sensibility of his previous Shakespeare films, it is the first to be set outside Argentina, as well as the only one thus far to engage with the Bard in English.

symposium
By Mark Asch | May 23, 2017

The Executive Order that claims to Protect the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States inspires a writer to dig into his family’s Jewish American immigrant legacy.

symposium
By Julien Allen | May 23, 2017

The commonwealth of Virginia has been a site of American judicial progress as well as conservatism, as proven by the Executive Order Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of Justice and Terrence Malick’s The New World.

symposium
By Jackson Arn | May 23, 2017

The 1985 science-fiction dystopia by director Terry Gilliam presaged the Trump era as much as Orwell, as reflected in the nonsensical bureaucracy of the Presidential Executive Order Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs.

symposium
By Daniel Witkin | May 23, 2017

The implications of executive order Enhancing Security in the Interior of the United States recall the 1970 American independent film Ice, directed by Robert Kramer, dramatizing the resistance of a group of urban radicals in the face of an ascendant fascist government.

review
By Jeff Reichert | May 19, 2017

The comparatively bite-sized, almost four-hour The Woman Who Left feels like a work that could start to open Lav Diaz up to a larger U.S. audience in a way that Norte, the End of History, his last film distributed here did not.