review
By Nick Pinkerton | December 8, 2016

I suspect Chazelle will be a name to watch for some time to come, and his third feature suggests that he has some definite ideas about popular moviemaking. Would I maybe loathe it a little less if it were not so unimpeachably competent?

symposium
By Emma Piper-Burket | December 5, 2016

Her continued relevance should come as no surprise as the realm of work that Varda has spent the past 60-plus years exploring—a multifaceted intersection between narrative and documentary—is becoming ever more in vogue.

review
By Nick Pinkerton | December 2, 2016

It is a laborious ordeal of unceasing histrionic assault and gymnastic hysterics, in its way a feminine counterpart to the monotonous masculine trudge of The Revenant, though Jackie has the decency at least to be brief.

symposium, interview
By Genevieve Yue | November 30, 2016

“I was filming this postcard, and my camera went [to my hand], and I thought instead of saying my hands are old with spots, I said, it’s a beautiful landscape. And in a way, it’s a way of being a filmmaker that my own age becomes a landscape.”

feature
By Ela Bittencourt | November 29, 2016
Festival Dispatch

The casual, festive atmosphere of the FicValdivia Festival, located at the small university town on the banks of Valdivia River in Chile is fueled by its largely young programmers and audience.

symposium
By Ohad Landesman | November 28, 2016

Appreciated from a perspective of sixteen years, the film now seems to fit perfectly in the moment of its making, but still feels as fresh, original, and full of optimism as it used to be when it was first released.

review
By Greg Cwik | November 23, 2016

Evolution is a serene film, one that exists in a state of twilight sedation, but beneath the surface something stirs, like the percolating uncertainty of a boy stricken with fever and confined to his bed.

review
By Jeff Reichert | November 22, 2016

A one-woman filmmaking army, Stratman exhibits a knack for choosing historically significant locations and then, through careful framing, the addition of the right sounds, the introduction of primary source texts and other unexpected choices, slowly unpacks the history of the place we are looking at.

symposium
By Nick Pinkerton | November 21, 2016

One Hundred and One Nights, all soft edges and winsomeness, is a nice little movie, maddeningly so. The cinema has written enough love letters to itself; it could use more anonymous threats, bricks through its window, and flaming turds on its porch.

review
By Nadine Zylberberg | November 21, 2016

Human languages are processed sequentially: left to right, right to left, top to bottom. Arrival draws parallels between our understanding of sentences and our notions of time and space, and then envisions a world without these boundaries.

review
By Jackson Arn | November 17, 2016

With his willingness to throw ordinary characters into almost unbearably tragic situations from which no greater meaning seems salvageable, Lonergan stands apart from the bulk of American narrative directors working today.

review
By Jeff Reichert | November 17, 2016

Marcel is the younger of the pair, and over the course of the film, we watch him turn from 52 to 53, lose his wife of 16 years, navigate single parenthood, and attempt rehab for alcoholism.

review
By Genevieve Yue | November 8, 2016

To the extent that eroticism is about arousing acceptable forms of sexual desire, then, Elle tries to separate its motivations: using sex because one needs it, i.e. to satisfy a compulsion or dominate another through rape (unerotic), or enjoying it as an end in itself (erotic).

symposium
By Michael Joshua Rowin | November 2, 2016

Jacquot de Nantes depicts the young Jacques Demy as both furiously precocious and fundamentally innocent, devouring the magic, myths, and mechanics of cinema.

feature

La Jetée, I Walked with a Zombie, Creepy, Jacob's Ladder, Young Sherlock Holmes, Vampyr, The Pit and the Pendulum