review
By Michael Koresky | February 9, 2016

The main characters move inexorably, helplessly toward disillusionment and alienation even as they seem to be always standing in more or less the same spot: at the edge of a precipice.

review
By Adam Nayman | February 8, 2016

Even those who reject their work on the grounds of temperament (snarky), ideology (right-leaning), or repetitiveness (guilty as charged) must concede the sheer, bristling cleverness of their choices as writers and directors.

review
By Vadim Rizov | February 5, 2016

When the camera slowly floats through communal areas, its relentless advance suggests menace; in close-ups the priests are pinned down with such entomological remorselessness that they nearly squirm.

feature
By Michael Koresky | January 29, 2016
Festival Dispatch

The camera is weapon and savior, mediator and patient observer, but it is never objective in Cameraperson, an extraordinary and singular filmmaking document by Kirsten Johnson that quietly lorded over everything I saw at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival.

review
By Nick Pinkerton | January 22, 2016

It is as niche a production as you will see, bound to attract a handful of true believers and a good bit of eye-rolling opprobrium, in part because it is directly concerned with hetero white male angst, which is not precisely the flavor of the month.

feature
| January 20, 2016
Years in Review

Movie of the Moment (for Worse), Best 3D, Best Failed Franchise Launch, Subprime Cinema Award, Most Metaphors, Worst Eating Habits, Paul Giamatti Award for Overacting, The Golden Torso Awards, and more!

feature
By Michael Sicinski | January 20, 2016
At the Museum

With naked bodies slowly twisting and writhing in a thick, inky chiaroscuro, a hazy but unidirectional light giving definition only to the rounded forms and flexing musculature of the women onscreen, it is clear that Grandrieux has painting on his mind.

feature
By Jordan Cronk | January 19, 2016
At the Museum

Kämmerer has, over ten years and as many films, established himself as one of Europe’s most exciting and formally economic young filmmakers.

review
By Jeff Reichert | January 14, 2016

His cinema is now one where only simple glances or gestures are necessary to convey multitudes. This kind of description has been applied to many filmmakers, but few directors are as pinpoint accurate as Garrel.

interview, feature
By Jordan Cronk | January 14, 2016
At the Museum

"The film is never going to be transferred to digital. It always has to be shown as film, and it was constructed as a palindrome, so it could be shown from either end, and you can’t really do that with digital."

feature
By Michael Sicinski | January 13, 2016
At the Museum

This mournful film takes the utopian aspiration of Communist dreams seriously, without overlooking the dangerous faults at their core.

interview
By Darren Hughes, Eric Hynes, Vadim Rizov | January 13, 2016

I have no theory on my own film. You know, cinema is gestural; this is what it has in common with dance or with painting. You take your camera, and people, and you write something with that, that resembles life.

feature
By Michael Pattison | January 12, 2016
At the Museum

"All the shots in my films are always the same, but they are different from one film to the other. In this film I did not want it to be too long. They are about fifteen seconds. It is the minimum. I cannot make this film with shots of less than fifteen seconds."

feature
| January 11, 2016
Years in Review

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, Youth, Son of Saul, Kingsman: The Secret Service, Sicario, Goodnight Mommy, Mommy, The Overnight, The Tribe, Legend, Jenny’s Wedding

interview
By Eric Hynes | January 8, 2016

There were times when the existential dread was so rough that I would have traded some good old sexual anxiety for it. It is a pretty horrific thing to discover that we might be finite mortals. There were moments in college when I would have given anything to be a struggling queer Christian.